Hi, all! We're an LGBTQ university organization located in Puerto Rico (Inter American University - Metropolitan Campus). We're a bi-lingual group centered around education and promotion of tolerance dealing mainly in the LGBTQ community. However, we also like to make sure that our straight allies are accommodated so we do our best do discuss the spectrum of issues faced by EVERYONE in terms of sex, sexuality and gender.

stevienyc:

Photos from protests for queer rights in the 80’s

As part of Crystal Bell’s NYU thesis project A Social OUTlet she released these photos via flickr from her brother’s personal collection.

A set of photos from a part of history that we may have never seen without social media.

To see the full set of photos visit here…

newwavefeminism:

what.the.literal.fuck
This ALL KINDS of inappropriate.
first of all, i doubt a bulk of that is even true. Why would she just up and decide to call her child by an entirely different name?
also, KUDOS for not shoving gendered toys down your daughters throat. 
The fact that the tabloid was so BOLD as to put “IS IT HARMING THE 3 YEAR OLD?” astounds me. OF COURSE IT ISN’T. There’s nothing HARMFUL about not subscribing to gender binaries. That’s basically propagandist hate speech. and by basically, i mean it is hate speech. They make it seem like shiloh is going to grow up all fucked up and confused because her mom occasionally dressed her up in pants and a t-shirt instead of a dress with pink frills.
what makes me the most mad, is that this probably isn’t even the case. it probably found that one picture, took it WAY outta context, and someone thought “i could use homophobia to turn this into a hot selling cover story!”
fucking shit.

newwavefeminism:

what.the.literal.fuck

This ALL KINDS of inappropriate.

  1. first of all, i doubt a bulk of that is even true. Why would she just up and decide to call her child by an entirely different name?
  2. also, KUDOS for not shoving gendered toys down your daughters throat. 
  3. The fact that the tabloid was so BOLD as to put “IS IT HARMING THE 3 YEAR OLD?” astounds me. OF COURSE IT ISN’T. There’s nothing HARMFUL about not subscribing to gender binaries. That’s basically propagandist hate speech. and by basically, i mean it is hate speech. They make it seem like shiloh is going to grow up all fucked up and confused because her mom occasionally dressed her up in pants and a t-shirt instead of a dress with pink frills.
  4. what makes me the most mad, is that this probably isn’t even the case. it probably found that one picture, took it WAY outta context, and someone thought “i could use homophobia to turn this into a hot selling cover story!”

fucking shit.

grrrlfever:

A page from issue #2 of grrrlfever zine, downloadable (for free) here.

grrrlfever:

A page from issue #2 of grrrlfever zine, downloadable (for free) here.

(Source: lesbolution)

gaywrites:

Welp. 

gaywrites:

Welp. 

equalitopia:

Transgender Awareness Week Infographic
glaad:

fenwayhealth:



In honor of Transgender Awareness Week, our youth health center, The Borum, is highlighting some of the challenges faced by trans and gender nonconforming youth.
Though we still need more research to better reflect the diversity of trans youth’s experiences, what we know now clearly points to a need to do more to care for and empower them.
Learn more here.
Our thanks to GLSEN, the National Center for Transgender Equality, and all the other great organizations whose work contributed to the creation of this graphic. 
Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here.



Learn more about Transgender Awareness Week: http://www.glaad.org/transawarenessweek 

equalitopia:

Transgender Awareness Week Infographic

glaad:

fenwayhealth:

In honor of Transgender Awareness Week, our youth health center, The Borum, is highlighting some of the challenges faced by trans and gender nonconforming youth.

Though we still need more research to better reflect the diversity of trans youth’s experiences, what we know now clearly points to a need to do more to care for and empower them.

Learn more here.

Our thanks to GLSEN, the National Center for Transgender Equality, and all the other great organizations whose work contributed to the creation of this graphic. 

Download/share a high-res PDF of this infographic here.

Learn more about Transgender Awareness Week: http://www.glaad.org/transawarenessweek 

(Source: zeeewok)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Infographics You May Have Missed
It is in the numbers! #
Based on 2010 Census informationfrom Andrew Lee, 2011

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Infographics You May Have Missed

It is in the numbers! #

Based on 2010 Census information
from Andrew Lee, 2011

fuckyeahfeminists:

Obama Nominates First Openly Gay Latina Federal Judge

President Obama nominated three new federal judges yesterday, including openly gay Judge Nitza I. Quiñones Alejandro, who currently serves on the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas.
If confirmed by the Senate, Judge Quiñones would be the first openly gay Latina to serve on the federal bench.

Looks like Obama does pretty well when it comes to the LGBT community and federal judgeships -

Judge Quiñones is the eighth openly gay life-tenured federal court judicial nominee named by President Obama, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Prior to the Obama Administration, only one openly gay individual had been confirmed to serve with lifetime tenure on our federal judiciary.

[Click the image for more info at Colorlines]

fuckyeahfeminists:

Obama Nominates First Openly Gay Latina Federal Judge

President Obama nominated three new federal judges yesterday, including openly gay Judge Nitza I. Quiñones Alejandro, who currently serves on the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas.

If confirmed by the Senate, Judge Quiñones would be the first openly gay Latina to serve on the federal bench.

Looks like Obama does pretty well when it comes to the LGBT community and federal judgeships -

Judge Quiñones is the eighth openly gay life-tenured federal court judicial nominee named by President Obama, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Prior to the Obama Administration, only one openly gay individual had been confirmed to serve with lifetime tenure on our federal judiciary.

[Click the image for more info at Colorlines]

pflagmom:

LGBT organizations condemn ‘Dr. Oz Show’ for episode on reparative therapy

excerpt from the article:

PFLAG National Executive Director Jody Huckaby agrees with Graddick. “A doctor’s first oath is to do no harm, and yet by making the decision to air this show, the harm has already been done. The doctrine espoused by so-called “ex-gay” organizations—that gay people can and should changetheir sexual orientation—has been condemned by every mainstream professional medical and mental health association. LGBT youth and their families must have access to safe and accurate information, and all responsible medical doctors, psychiatrists, and therapists have a responsibility to convey such information, not offer up dangerousdebunked methods as legitimate or as fact. What LGBT youth need is the love, support, and acceptance of their parents, families, and friends, not to be told to change who they are.”

The American Medical Association states “(We) oppose any psychiatric treatment, such as “reparative” or “conversion” therapy which is based upon the assumption that homosexuality per se is a mental disorder or based upon the a priori assumption that the patient should change his/her homosexual orientation.“ The AMA also says that “most of the emotional disturbance experienced by gay men and lesbians around their sexual identity is not based on physiological causes but rather is due more to a sense of alienation in an unaccepting environment.”

We were telling a story that was fundamentally about intolerance. We believed that it was important to have the strength of our convictions. And yes, we played it off as a punch line to a joke. But in a sense, that made it all the more potent.

—Gay writer/director Chris Butler talks about his movie ParaNorman, the first animated film with a gay main character. This part of the film garnered some criticism from conservatives who were outraged to see another reiteration of the “gay agenda,” but here Butler and co-creator Sam Fell talk about why it was so important. More. (via gaywrites)

thetrevorproject:

Flashback Friday: Darren Criss performs “Not Alone” at Trevor Live 2010. See him walk the carpet during our live stream on Sunday, 5-7p PST.

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Vlogs You May Have Missed

I’M PANSEXUAL!? by sex-positive vlogger Laci Green.

“…No, I’m not attracted to everyone. That would be exhausting. I’m still concerned with someone’s values, what kind of person they are, what they’re doing with their life, how sexy I find them. It’s just that their genitals and gender identity and gender expression have nothing to do with those things for me.”

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Infographic You May Have Missed


Public Pride!

(source)

letsgetcortical:

A scientist with a brain scanner could figure out your sexual orientation based on the symmetry of your brain, new research from the Stockholm Brain Institute hints.

The findings support the notion that biological factors help determine sexual orientation and leave a specific neuroanatomical signature.

Using MRI scans of gay and straight men and women, the researchers found that people who liked women — heterosexual men and homosexual women — had larger right brain hemispheres, while people who liked men — heterosexual women and homosexual men — had symmetrical brains. As seen in the image, MRI and PET scans showed a similar pattern in two specific regions of the brain, the right and left amygdalas, which are thought to control fight-or-flight reactions. 

“The results cannot be primarily ascribed to learned effects, and they suggest a linkage to neurobiological entities,” the researchers, led by Ivanka Savic, write in a paper that will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences tomorrow.

Scientists have long tried to determine if sexual orientation is biologically determined, and if so, how. This research has been contentious in and outside the gay community. At stake is whether homosexuality is a choice or biologically inevitable. The groundbreaking work in the field of biological difference came from Simon LeVay, a self-identified gay neuroscientist, who found similarities in the brains of straight women and gay men in the early 90s. LeVay has his detractors, but recent studies seem to back his early research.

Pink News, billed as Europe’s largest gay news service, cut straight to the chase about the implications of recent studies that have found measurable differences in the biology of men and women with different sexual orientations.

“These studies imply that the brains of the gay men have functional similarities to those of a straight woman, and that homosexuality is not of a moral choice, but one of biological substrate,” wrote Jane Rochstad Lim.

While the research is suggestive, it does not address how such brain differences come to be, although the researchers noted that there could be genetic, environmental and/or sex hormonal factors.

queermuseum:

For World AIDS Day 2012 / Day With(out) Art, I offer this writing on how HIV and queer history impact me. —Ted Kerr 
Before I knew Harvey Milk, I was digging Gran Fury. Before I knew Harry Hay, I was reading Sarah Schulman. Coming up in the world, AIDS was how I tapped into my queer heritage, how I began to learn my gay history. 
And still, through AIDS activism I find myself, I am myself. Through AIDS I learn about feminism, and collectives, polamoury and sexual self-determination. AIDS helps me understand globalism, corruption, and the multiple ways that history works backwards, forwards and can be used as a hope for a future utopia. And the importance of bathhouses as centers for learning. 
Immersing myself in the response to HIV is an ingoing crash course on intersectionality: how classism, racism, xenophobia, transphobia, homophobia, misogyny and the prison industrial complex impact and exasperated a medical condition.  As much as I understand AIDS activism is related to idea of a medical cure, for me it is also about so much more. 
Increasingly I am aware, I am not alone in this way. We are in a moment of AIDS Crisis Revisitation. People, both living with HIV and not, are looking at the early response to HIV as a way to understand the past and navigate the present and the future. As we can see with the release of new films (United in Anger, How to Survive a Plague), and mounted retrospectives (General Idea, Gran Fury, Frank Moore) we are at a cultural moment where there is a desire to look back at the beginning of the AIDS crisis.  There is both stomach, and heart to see what happened, to see what is happening. 
It is a complicated reflex. It was a time wrought with pain and loss, both of which live on in how communities hard hit by HIV treat each other, and how we are treated by the state, the non profit industrial complex, and culture. In some ways we are largely neglected, feeling guilty, and confused about how to move forward. 
And yet looking back can also be inspiring. It was also a time, in Schulman’s words, where groups of despised people fought back and saved each other’s lives. Activists demanded drugs into bodies faster. People rose up against the marginal places they had been placed and became leaders. Outsiders educated themselves and others to become the experts. For queer people is there anything more inspiring? What else in our collective, fractured, uncovering, histories can compete? And so, beyond the fact that HIV is first and foremost a virus, it has become the example, the symbol of the ways the queer body can be neglected, activated against, disregarded and hated. And how, when a group of queers come together (not even having to agree!) they can change the world for the better. 
But we cannot linger only in the past. As the artist collective Little Elvis said long ago, AIDS IS NOT OVER. An important part of this moment of AIDS Crisis Revisitation is activists, and cultural workers are figuring out how to braid the past with the present to build futures. For me personally this means thinking of what happens after we learn how to eradicate the virus. A cure is for the body, so what about the body politic? How do we continue to harness the power of AIDS activism to make a better world for everyone? This is what I hope people thinking about World AIDS Day 2012. 
Image from Wisdom in Being United in Anger, a tumblr inspired by the film United in Anger: A History of ACT UP, being distributed by Visual AIDS for Day With(out) Art.  

There is a big HIV/AIDs problem here in Puerto Rico. I think it’s really important that people are aware and educated. 

queermuseum:

For World AIDS Day 2012 / Day With(out) Art, I offer this writing on how HIV and queer history impact me. —Ted Kerr

Before I knew Harvey Milk, I was digging Gran Fury. Before I knew Harry Hay, I was reading Sarah Schulman. Coming up in the world, AIDS was how I tapped into my queer heritage, how I began to learn my gay history.

And still, through AIDS activism I find myself, I am myself. Through AIDS I learn about feminism, and collectives, polamoury and sexual self-determination. AIDS helps me understand globalism, corruption, and the multiple ways that history works backwards, forwards and can be used as a hope for a future utopia. And the importance of bathhouses as centers for learning.

Immersing myself in the response to HIV is an ingoing crash course on intersectionality: how classism, racism, xenophobia, transphobia, homophobia, misogyny and the prison industrial complex impact and exasperated a medical condition.  As much as I understand AIDS activism is related to idea of a medical cure, for me it is also about so much more.

Increasingly I am aware, I am not alone in this way. We are in a moment of AIDS Crisis Revisitation. People, both living with HIV and not, are looking at the early response to HIV as a way to understand the past and navigate the present and the future. As we can see with the release of new films (United in Anger, How to Survive a Plague), and mounted retrospectives (General Idea, Gran Fury, Frank Moore) we are at a cultural moment where there is a desire to look back at the beginning of the AIDS crisis.  There is both stomach, and heart to see what happened, to see what is happening.

It is a complicated reflex. It was a time wrought with pain and loss, both of which live on in how communities hard hit by HIV treat each other, and how we are treated by the state, the non profit industrial complex, and culture. In some ways we are largely neglected, feeling guilty, and confused about how to move forward.

And yet looking back can also be inspiring. It was also a time, in Schulman’s words, where groups of despised people fought back and saved each other’s lives. Activists demanded drugs into bodies faster. People rose up against the marginal places they had been placed and became leaders. Outsiders educated themselves and others to become the experts. For queer people is there anything more inspiring? What else in our collective, fractured, uncovering, histories can compete? And so, beyond the fact that HIV is first and foremost a virus, it has become the example, the symbol of the ways the queer body can be neglected, activated against, disregarded and hated. And how, when a group of queers come together (not even having to agree!) they can change the world for the better.

But we cannot linger only in the past. As the artist collective Little Elvis said long ago, AIDS IS NOT OVER. An important part of this moment of AIDS Crisis Revisitation is activists, and cultural workers are figuring out how to braid the past with the present to build futures. For me personally this means thinking of what happens after we learn how to eradicate the virus. A cure is for the body, so what about the body politic? How do we continue to harness the power of AIDS activism to make a better world for everyone? This is what I hope people thinking about World AIDS Day 2012.

Image from Wisdom in Being United in Anger, a tumblr inspired by the film United in Anger: A History of ACT UP, being distributed by Visual AIDS for Day With(out) Art

There is a big HIV/AIDs problem here in Puerto Rico. I think it’s really important that people are aware and educated.